0

Every hair on the body, face and scalp grows from a hair follicle and undergoes a repetitive sequence of growth, falling out and then resting known as the hair growth cycle.

It can be helpful to have some information about the hair growth cycle so that you can have a better understanding of any problems Additionally, many hair loss and thinning products often relate to specific phases within the hair growth cycle. Once you are familiar with the terms and phrases, you will be better able to discover products that may be helpful.

The hair growth cycle consists of three stages called ‘phases’ known as:

1. Hair growth cycle
A. Anagen - Growing phase

Each new hair begins in the growth stage, known as the anagen phase. On the scalp this phase varies considerably. It usually lasts an average of 3-5 years but can take up to 7 years.

The hair grows at different rates in different people. The length that hair can grow to on the scalp depends on how long the hair stays in the Anagen phase of the cycle. The average rate is around 1.25cm (0.5in) per month.

Hair colour is created by pigment cells producing melanin in the hair follicle. This is what defines our natural hair colour. With ageing, pigment cells die and hair turns grey or white.

B. Catagen - Transitional phase

The next phase your hair enters is a transitional stage known as the Catagen phase. The hair stops growing but is still held in place. This is normally a short transitional phase that lasts approximately 10 -14 days.

C. Telogen - Shedding, falling out and resting phase

In the last stage, known as the Telogen phase, your hair is released from the follicle and so falls out (shedding).

Next, as part of the telogen phase, the follicle enters a rest phase for up to approximately 3 months. After this time the entire process is usually repeated, starting again at the Anagen growing phase.

Each follicle is independent and goes through the hair growth cycle at different times. Around 10 -15 percent of the hair is normally in a natural catogen or telogen stage. Otherwise all your hair would fall out at once. Instead, you normally lose a certain number of hairs – on average between 20 and 80 – each day.

2: Hair loss and hair thinning problems

Alopecia is the general medical term for hair loss. There are many types of hair loss with different symptoms and causes. Some hair loss is a natural part of changes in the body, for example hormonal changes that occur after pregnancy in women and male pattern baldness in men.

Hair loss can become problematic when you lose more hairs than you replace. Often people refer to hair loss as hair thinning, meaning that their overall mass of hair has reduced.

There are many reasons why hair loss can occur. Our section Common Hair Loss Related Topics will offer you both insights and ideas.

Equally there are multiple ways to help prevent some forms of hair loss and stimulate new hair growth. We offer a vast range of camouflage and cover up products to conceal areas of thinning or baldness, everything you need for expert hair care.

3: Preventing hair loss & encouraging new growth

With a basic understanding of the phases of the hair growth cycle, it can be easier to grasp how some hair loss prevention treatments and products work. This is why specialist products for hair loss will often refer to this hair growth cycle.

If you are affected by hair loss there are many options available to help you have confidence during this time. You may find it helpful to take a look at common hair loss related topics or discover how we can help you.

1. Female hair loss and thinning

There are many different reasons why hair loss or thinning can happen. It is so important to have a range of options so that you can continue to have confidence in how you look and feel.

We hope that our guide to some of the most common types of hair loss along with helpful ideas to prevent, blend and camouflage thinning areas, style and maintain hair as well as encourage new hair growth, will support you during any changes to your hair.

Women and hair loss

A large number of women will experience some form of hair loss and regrowth over a lifetime. Many types of hair loss in women are temporary, meaning that there is a good chance that hair growth will restart as part of the natural hair growth cycle. Whilst it is rare that women will experience long term hair loss, this can happen.

One way to look at hair loss in women can be to place hair loss experiences into three main types.

  • Temporary : Meaning that the hair will grow back such as after pregnancy.
  • Semi-Permanent : Meaning that hair loss will reoccur. Hair may be sparse in areas while other hair may continue to grow as normal. A good example of this is Female Pattern Baldness.s
  • Long-Term : Meaning that hair loss is not expected to grow back. Medical interventions and specialist items such scalp care products, false eyelashes and brow make-up, wigs, scarves and other hair loss replacements may be considered.

Common types of hair loss experienced by women

Some forms of hair loss are due to changes during a woman's life time, such as naturally occurring hormonal changes. For example after pregnancy, during the stages of menopause or age-related. Other hair loss issues can arise from nutritional deficiencies or environmental and styling strain on the hair. One of the types of hair loss in women that is less well understood is called Female Pattern Baldness.

Additionally, hair loss can arise due to medical conditions or as a side effect to medications. For example chemotherapy is the most commonly known type of treatment for cancer that may cause hair loss as a side effect. What many people don’t know is that there is a treatment called scalp cooling that can help to prevent hair loss due to chemotherapy.

Concerns with hair loss

We really want to support you with concerns about hair loss. We know that most of the time it is hair loss on the scalp and face (eyelashes and brows) that causes concern for women. No matter what type of hair loss you are experiencing, we are confident that we can offer you a wide selection of information, ideas for prevention, styling and specialist items throughout your hair loss journey.

For any medical concerns we always recommend that you seek advice from a doctor. Additionally, if hair loss is worrying you there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas.

2. Female pattern baldness

Overview Female Pattern Baldness

Female pattern baldness is reported on less than male pattern hair loss. It is thought that male hormones (even in women) influence the sensitive hair growth cycle, especially after the menopause. However, whilst it is widely understood that male pattern baldness is hereditary it is not clear if this is the case with female pattern baldness

Hair loss tends to be gradual, meaning that hair falls out over a period of time. New hairs formed as part of the ongoing hair growth cycle can become thinner in diameter. This is referred to as follicle miniaturisation.

Follicle miniaturisation

The mass of your hair can become gradually thinner over time. Each hair grows in different phases of the hair growth cycle. When hair becomes finer and thinner in diameter after each successive cycle this is referred to as follicle miniaturisation. Whilst hair may still grow, it can become so fine that it is not very noticeable. This is common in men but can also occur in women.

The pattern of hair loss

The pattern that female hair loss creates is different from male pattern hair loss. In women the pattern tends to be a generally noticeable reduction of hair or very fine hairs (follicle miniaturisation) over the mid-front of the scalp.

Women often describe a general loss of volume, for example a ponytail may feel less dense.

Prevention

A large variety of products are available to prevent hair loss in the early stages, and to maintain the hair that you have while encouraging new hair growth.

For prescription treatments you should seek guidance from your doctor and a pharmacist.

Camouflage/cover-up

Many women opt to use products that can help to blend in any areas of hair that feel sparse.

These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair. They are similar to styling products but especially developed to conceal areas of hair loss. They blend well with shorter lengths as well as longer hair.

Maintenance

There are many helpful ideas to maintain the hair that you have as well as supporting new hair growth.

  • Top Tips: Evaluate your hair and scalp – Talking to a hairdresser to discover everything you need for expert hair care can make all the difference. It can be very helpful to assess the needs of your hair and scalp. For example, when hair is sparser any scalp issues such as dandruff can show up more easily. Using styling products designed for hair thinning can help to maximise your hair’s potential. Brittle/dry hair and breakage - Regular trims and maintaining hair moisture can make all the difference to avoiding unnecessary breakage. Taking time to use conditioning treatments as well as styling products designed for hair thinning and fragile hair can be very helpful. Supplements that support your hair - You may like to consider taking a supplement developed to help support healthy hair growth.
  • Re-Growth: In the case when hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth.
  • New Hair Growth: It may be that you have opted for a prescription regime and are experiencing new hair growth. Using specialist shampoos and conditioners can help to optimise and nourish new hair.
  • Support: Female pattern baldness doesn’t happen quickly. If you notice sudden areas of hair loss or lose a lot of hair over a very short period of time, or if you are at all concerned about hair thinning or hair loss you should always seek medical advice. Additionally there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas.
3. Male hair loss and thinning

Many men will experience hair thinning and hair loss. There are several things you can do to try and prevent hair loss and ways that you can improve the look and feel of your hair.

The most common forms of hair loss in men are:

  • Male Pattern Baldness: By far the most common reason for hair thinning and hair loss in men is when male hormones influence the hair growth cycle resulting in a receding hairline and other common characteristics. This is commonly referred to as Male Pattern Baldness.
  • Follicle miniaturisation: The mass of your hair can become gradually thinner over time. Each hair grows in different phases of the hair growth cycle. When hair becomes finer and thinner in diameter after each successive cycle this is referred to as follicle miniaturisation. Whilst hair may still grow, it can become so fine that it is not very noticeable. This is common in men but can also occur in women.
  • Side effects of medication or medical treatment : Some medications can cause hair loss as a side- effect to treatment. If you know that the medication you are taking is likely to cause hair loss, such as chemotherapy, then you can look at preventions and different ways to manage how you look and feel. Chemotherapy - It may be helpful to know that there is a hair loss prevention treatment called scalp cooling that could be available to you if you have been diagnosed with cancer.
  • Underlying medical issues: As well as side effects to medicines, sometimes hair loss can be the result of an underlying health issue.
  • Preventing hair loss and improving your style: We hope that our guide to some of the most common types of hair loss, along with helpful ideas to prevent hair loss, blend and camouflage thinning areas, style and maintain hair as well as encourage new hair growth, may support you during any changes to your hair.

For any medical concerns we always recommend that you seek advice from a doctor. Additionally, if hair loss is worrying you there are several organisations that can offer guidance and ideas.

4. Male pattern baldness

Around half of all men will experience male pattern baldness by the time they are 50. Male pattern baldness usually starts when a man is in his 20s. It is commonly understood that male pattern baldness is hereditary. The main factor being certain male hormones that influence the sensitive hair follicles within the hair growth cycle.

Hair loss tends to be gradual, meaning that hair falls out over a long period of time. This is referred to as follicle miniaturisation.

  • Follicle miniaturisation: The mass of your hair can become gradually thinner over time. Each hair grows in different phases of the hair growth cycle. When hair becomes finer and thinner in diameter after each successive cycle this is called follicle miniaturisation. Whilst hair may still grow it can become so fine that it is not very noticeable. This is common in men but can also occur in women.
  • The pattern of hair loss: The pattern that male hair loss creates varies. However, hair often recedes to create a ‘horseshoe’ shape. It is rare that male pattern hair loss results in complete baldness.
  • Patterns of hair loss:
    • Slightly receding hairline
    • Advanced receding from the forehead
    • Thinning crown
    • Overall reduction in thickness resulting in sparse hair mass
    • Very fine hairs (follicle miniaturisation)
    • Horseshoe shape
  • Prevention: There are many products that can be used to try and prevent hair loss in the early stages. Additionally there are items available to maintain the hair that you have, and encourage an ideal platform for new hair growth. For prescription treatments you should seek guidance from your doctor and a pharmacist.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: Many men opt to use products that can help to blend in areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair. They are similar to styling products but especially developed to conceal areas of hair loss. They blend well in shorter lengths as well as longer hair.
  • Maintenance: There are many helpful ideas to maintain the hair that you have.
  • Top tips: Evaluate your hair and scalp - It can be helpful to assess the needs of your hair and scalp. For example, when hair is sparser any scalp issues such as dandruff can show up more easily. Use styling products designed for hair thinning such as specialist styling products developed to help maximise your hair’s potential. Brittle/dry hair and breakage - Regular trims and maintaining your hair’s moisture can prevent unnecessary breakage. Taking time to use conditioning treatments and styling products designed for hair thinning and fragile hair can be very helpful.
  • Supplements that support your hair: You may consider taking a supplement developed to help support healthy hair growth.
  • Re-growth: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth.
  • New Hair Growth: It may be that you have opted for a prescription regime and are experiencing new hair growth. Using specialist shampoos and conditioners can help to optimise and nourish new hair.
  • Support: Male pattern baldness doesn’t happen quickly. If you notice sudden areas of hair loss or lose a lot of hair over a very short period of time, or are at all concerned about hair thinning or hair loss you should always seek medical advice.

Additionally there are several organisations that can offer guidance and ideas.

5. Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy treatment for cancer can cause hair to be brittle, thin or completely fall out. This is because chemotherapy can interrupt the hair growth cycle. Not all chemotherapy treatments cause hair loss. Hair loss or hair thinning is generally temporary, meaning that the hair normally grows back once treatment is complete. The only known prevention is scalp cooling, a treatment developed to reduce hair loss, which can be used with some forms of chemotherapy.

It’s always best to talk to your cancer nurse to find out what side-effects you may experience, so that you know what to expect and what services are available to support you.

We have a huge range of suggestions, products, hints and tips to help you discover new ideas if your hair changes. From expert products to blend and disguise areas of hair thinning, to scalp care products and a range of items to support and nourish new hair growth. Our beauty department also hosts a wide range of fake eyelashes and specialist make-up for brows.

Most importantly, we hope to help you gain the confidence you need at this challenging time. As well as product ideas, you can take steps to care for your scalp and wear specialist items such as a wig, scarf or headwear.

We can also help you to find creative ways to look good while your hair is changing.

  • Prevention: Scalp cooling is a treatment to try and prevent or reduce hair loss during chemotherapy treatment. You may be able to try scalp cooling if your chemotherapy drug is compatible to treatment. You’ll also need to check if your health care provider offers it, and seek approval from your oncologist. Scalp cooling is the only known hair loss prevention treatment. Ideally it will help you to maintain your hair. Using nourishing shampoos and conditioners during scalp cooling and taking a gentle approach to styling can help to maintain your hair’s condition at this fragile time. You may also be advised to take a break from permanent hair colouring. Camouflage and cover up products can be helpful for disguising roots and blending. Once scalp cooling treatment and chemotherapy is complete you will want to maintain your hair’s condition and support any new growth. As soon as your hair and scalp feel stable and healthy you can return to your regular routine including colouring, using chemical treatments such as relaxants and styling with heated appliances.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: We offer a state of the art range of easy to use products to help blend and disguise areas of hair thinning, bald patches and to also blend roots that need colouring. Whether you are unable to colour hair during chemotherapy or your hair has thinned in density or bald patches have appeared, our range of products are specifically designed to use at home, giving you a natural fuller look. Cleverly designed, our specialist products help to fill in sparse areas by making hair look fuller and thicker. Additionally a wide variety of colour choices means that you can blend away any unwanted greys and white hairs or hide roots. Take a look at the very latest products to camouflage and cover up. Hair pieces or wigs may also be an option. You may be eligible for financial support as hair loss is a side-effect to medication. To access this support speak with your cancer nurse.
  • Maintenance: If you are experiencing hair loss it’s important to look after your scalp. Perhaps you are having scalp cooling treatment and wish to nourish and protect your hair. Chemotherapy treatments can also make hair feel brittle and dry, so you may simply be looking for ways to best care for your hair at this time.
  • Scalp care: Taking care of your scalp helps to promote good skin care and nourish new hair growth. If you are experiencing total hair loss a product to balance and retain scalp moisture can be helpful. If you are encouraging new hair growth or experiencing any scalp concerns we have specialist shampoos, conditioners and treatments to help.
  • Scalp cooling: Shampoos and conditioners to nurture your scalp and maintain hair moisture levels are one way to aid your hair during treatment. Take a look at our hair care tips for when you are experiencing changes during chemotherapy. Hair care - Chemotherapy treatment can make the hair more brittle, dry and fragile. This may mean that you need to adapt your current hair care regime. Additionally, hair prevention treatments such as scalp cooling may mean that you need to be especially careful with your hair at this time. Take a look at our tips below.
  • TOP TIPS:: Brows and lashes: If your facial hair falls out or reduces as a side effect to chemotherapy treatment you may like to consider fake eyelashes and brow make-up. We have a large variety of specialist make-up products available. These include realistic or creative eyebrows and lashes to professional eyebrow make-up solutions that are easy to use at home.
  • Tools for tangles: Hair is very fragile when wet. Take time to gently massage your scalp when you shampoo your hair to avoid hair matting. Use a wide tooth comb or a specialist ‘tangle’ brush to gently allow conditioner to slip through the hair and ease out any tangles.
  • Products that nourish and protect: It may be that your scalp and hair are feeling different to normal. Common issues during chemotherapy and scalp cooling are more fragile, dry, weak, thin and brittle hair. These hair types can benefit from shampoos that nourish your hair and scalp and conditioners that will give your hair deep moisture content. Styling products may also need to be considered. Using a heat protection product will help to preserve your hair but allow gentle use of a hair dryer. You may also need products to disguise any areas of hair thinning. Once chemotherapy treatment is complete it is a good time to use specialist products to stimulate new hair growth. Once your hair feels stable, you can then return to regular regimes such as colouring hair.
  • Re-growth: It may be that you experienced total hair loss, hair thinning or patches of hair loss. Either way, when your chemotherapy treatment finishes it is an ideal time to look at your hair care regime. Putting in place steps to nourish and protect new hair growth can provide an ideal opportunity for your hair to recover.
  • TOP TIPS:: Specialist new hair growth products: Generally, once chemotherapy treatment is complete new hair starts to grow as each follicle enters a new phase of the hair growth cycle called the anagen phase. The new hair growth cycle can be a little slow to begin with. To help promote good growth, the hair follicles need to be stimulated, bringing essential oxygen and nutrients to each hair root. Take a look at our range of specialist products specifically developed to be easy to use at home by experts in hair loss and new hair growth.
  • Supplements: Sometimes hair needs a boost of essential vitamins and minerals that help to promote good growth. Taking a supplement can be a good way to help feed your follicles with extra strength.
  • Thicker and fuller look: Until faced with hair loss, many people don’t know about the huge variety of products available to skilfully blend in thinning hair or areas of baldness. Using styling products that are developed to help hair look and feel thicker and fuller can also be very helpful.
  • Support: Hair loss can have a huge impact on how you feel about your everyday life. Do ask your nurse for support. Additionally we want to help by linking you to organisations that can offer support.

Take a look at our support with hair loss section for further reading and guidance.

6. Menopause

The menopause is a natural part of the body’s cycle for women. Leading up to, during and after the menopause, many women report changes to their hair and scalp and some report hair thinning or hair loss. Hormonal fluctuations taking place in the body do often affect how our skin and sensitive hair follicles perform. For example, some hormonal changes interrupt the anagen phase in the hair growth cycle. Additionally some women may experience female pattern baldness as a result of an increase in male hormones that can occur after the menopause.

Some people report experiences such as hot flushes, changes to the scalp, hair thinning and hair loss. There are many options available to support the changes in your hair and scalp at this time. We will introduce you to everything you need for expert hair care.

  • Prevention: As your body goes through the natural menopause process, one of the best ways to support changes is to re-evaluate your hair and scalp type. For example, hair can become weaker and so in turn is more fragile. Using specialist products to help protect the hair and nourish your scalp can help to prevent breakage. There are also many product regimes developed to help combat early signs of hair loss. Another helpful way to support changes in your body during the menopause and prevent depletion of essential nutrients, is to take a hair growth supplement.
  • Medications: Some medications taken during the menopause can alter hormonal effects on the body and affect the hair growth cycle in both positive and negative ways. Talk with your doctor if you feel your hair and scalp are affected
  • Camouflage/cover-up: If you do experience hair thinning or areas of hair loss there are lots of products available that can help to blend areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair. They are similar to styling products but specially developed to conceal areas of hair loss.
  • Maintenance: The hormonal fluctuations during the menopause can create problems for your regular styling regime. See below for some helpful tips:
  • Hot flushes: Many women report hot flushes resulting in an excessively oily scalp. You can try appropriate products such as dry shampoos to help combat this.
  • Colour: Colouring can help the hair to appear more voluminous. Additionally, as coloured hair often needs more moisturising the hair can absorb any additional oil (common during menopause) produced and thus help to combat an oily scalp.
  • Volumising styling products: You may also like to try specialist styling products developed to maximise your hair’s potential.
  • Brittle/dry hair and breakage: Regular trims and maintaining your hair’s moisture can prevent unnecessary breakage. Taking time to use conditioning treatments, heat protection and styling products designed for hair thinning and fragile hair can be very helpful.
  • Re-growth: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth.
  • Support: If you are at all concerned about hair thinning or hair loss you should always seek medical advice. Additionally there are several organisations that can offer guidance and ideas.
7. Nutritional deficiency

Nutritional Deficiency

Hair is very sensitive to any changes within the body. Something as simple as a change in diet can have a direct influence on the hair growth cycle and cause hair to fall out and thin.

What you eat and how your body absorbs and distributes essential vitamins, glucose and proteins is very important in maintaining the regular hair growth cycle. For example, people who have an iron deficiency called anaemia often experience thinning hair and hair loss. This is because iron is essential to healthy hair. Additionally pregnancy, loss of blood and illness and can also be causes of anaemia.

A healthy balanced diet full of fresh fruit and vegetables as well as iron rich foods can be beneficial to hair growth.

  • Prevention: When it comes to nutritional deficiencies it is important to seek advice from a doctor if you suspect health issues. There can be many reasons why the body lacks nutrients needed for good hair growth. One way to avoid hair thinning is to ensure that you have a balanced diet and avoid sudden diets that result in rapid weight loss. This type of change can trigger the hair to go into the (telogen) hair loss phase very quickly and result in hair loss and thinning. As well as seeking medical advice about your diet, you might also consider taking supplements for maintaining healthy hair.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: There are lots of helpful products available that can blend in areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair.
  • Maintenance: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth. You may also like to try specialist styling products developed to help maximise your hair’s potential during this time.
  • Re-growth: Taking care of your hair and scalp creates a platform for new hair growth. As well as maintaining a balanced diet you may also use products that can stimulate new hair growth. Once your nutritional intake is balanced and any underlying causes of deficiency have been rectified, new hair growth normally takes around 3-6 months from the time the hair falls out. This is when the hair enters back into the hair growth cycle at the anagen stage. It can take a while for the new hair to integrate into your current style.
  • Support: If you suspect that you have a nutritional deficiency causing hair thinning or hair loss you should always seek medical advice. If hair loss is worrying you, there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas."
8. Pregnancy

Hair thinning after pregnancy is very common. This type of hair loss is often referred to as post-partum or telogen effluvium. It is very common for women to notice that they lose more hairs than normal around 2-9 months after giving birth. However, it is not normal to lose all of your hair, rather the hair is less sparse. Hair normally returns to a more regular growing pattern over a period of time.

  • Below we take a more in-depth look at why this may occur: The main reason why hair thinning occurs after pregnancy is a disturbance in the normal hair growth cycle. It is widely understood that during pregnancy raised oestrogen levels keep your hair in the growing (anagen) phase for longer than usual. Some women report that their hair feels fuller during pregnancy. If hair loss occurs a few months after giving birth this is thought to be due to oestrogen levels returning to normal. It can also be linked to fluctuations in other hormones and essential nutrients. If you do experience this type of hair thinning, after a phase of hair falling out (telogen) and seeming sparse in places, the hair normally returns to a more regular growth cycle. Over time the hair feels more voluminous again. This is because each hair follicle goes through a resting phase (telogen) of around 3 months before each new hair starts to appear.
  • Prevention: There is no known prevention for post pregnancy hair loss as this is due to a natural occurrence in the body following a necessary change in hormones. Eating a healthy, balanced diet with a good variety of iron and protein-rich foods and fresh fruit and vegetables might be helpful. You may also consider taking supplements for an extra boost.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: There are lots of products available that can help to blend in areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair.
  • Maintenance: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. We have everything you need for expert hair care. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth. You may also like to try specialist styling products developed to maximise your hair’s potential during this time.
  • Re-growth: New hair growth normally takes around 3-6 months from the time the hair falls out. This is when the hair enters back into the hair growth cycle at the anagen stage. It can take a while for the new hair to integrate into your current style. If you have experienced hair thinning you may also like to use products that blend and camouflage areas of new hair growth with hair that didn’t fall out. This can be helpful when you experience shorter new hair amongst longer lengths.
  • Support: If hair loss is worrying you there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas."
9. Environmental and styling stress

Environmental & Styling Strain

The environment we live in, our lifestyle, and how we style and treat our hair can all have a negative effect and even cause hair thinning and loss. The good news is that if environmental and styling issues are the underlying cause, the effects should be largely preventable and reversible. Examples of common issues:

  • Chlorine: Our hair is quite fragile and susceptible to weaken in some situations. For example, hair that is regularly exposed to harsh chemicals such as chlorine can become brittle, dry and eventually break.
  • Colouring and chemical processes: A well applied hair colour or chemical process such as relaxing hair, should not cause hair loss or thinning. It makes sense that if hair is fragile, brittle or dry, appropriate products should be used to prevent damage. Over processing can lead to dry and brittle hair that may break and fall out, leading eventually to hair thinning. A professional hairdresser won’t allow this to occur, as they will take steps to advise you on how to best care for your hair.
  • Traction hair loss: Traction hair loss is often referred to as traction alopecia. This type of hair loss results from over ‘pulling’ the hair. Putting too much tension on the fragile hair follicle results in the hair becoming weaker, eventually causing breakage or the hair to fall out. Commonly traction hair loss is caused when very tight styling techniques are repeatedly used without giving the hair a rest. Weaves, braids, hair extensions and regular tight styles can result in traction alopecia. The good news is that these types of techniques can be avoided for a time, giving the hair a chance to recover. The above-mentioned issues are normally avoidable. Take a look at how to prevent these types of hair loss situations from occurring.
  • Prevention: Taking good care of your hair and scalp are essential for healthy hair growth and a good looking style. When it comes to avoiding over processing hair during colour or chemical processes choose an experienced stylist who can apply products correctly and advise on maintaining your hairstyle without causing damage. Chlorine overexposure can be helped with specific products that can prevent damage and hydrate dry hairs. If you regularly wear weaves, extensions or have very tight styles, your hair may benefit from conditioning treatments and a gentler approach to styling until it rejuvenates. If hair breakage, thinning or hair loss have already occurred, be sure to give your hair a rest from any styling or techniques causing unnecessary stress or tension. You can use products to conceal and camouflage any areas of hair thinning as well as products designed to produce a fuller look. Use products that will appropriately maintain your hair as well as nourish the scalp and encourage new hair growth.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: If hair loss or thinning has occurred there are lots of helpful products available that can help to blend in areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover-up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair.
  • Maintenance: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth. You may also like to try specialist styling products developed to help maximise your hair’s potential during this time.
  • Re-growth: Taking care of your hair and scalp are a helpful start to creating a platform for new growth. Using products specifically developed to rejuvenate new hair can be helpful. As well as maintaining a balanced diet you may consider taking supplements for an additional boost. Once your scalp has had a rest from any styling or factors causing tension alopecia or environmental damage new hairs should start to grow. This growing stage is called the anagen phase. It can take a while for the new hair to integrate into your current style.
  • Support: If your hair loss is severe or you are worried you should always consult with a medical practitioner. If hair loss is worrying you there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas.
10. Medical issues

Some medications can cause hair loss as a side-effect to treatment. Hair loss can also be due to a health issue.

Identifying the reason for hair loss or hair thinning can be a complex process. In relation to any medical issues you should always consult with your doctor. There are also organisations that can help with supportive ideas, products and in some cases help to diagnose the underlying cause of hair loss conditions.

If you know that the medication you are taking is likely to cause hair loss, such as some treatments for chemotherapy, then you can look at preventions and ways to manage how you look and feel.

As well as side effects to medicines sometimes hair loss can be a result of an underlying health issue or part of a natural process such as ageing. Changes or fluctuations in hormones such as male pattern baldness, female pattern baldness, and menopause or post pregnancy can all cause hair loss. Additionally some treatments such as radiotherapy to the scalp area may also cause hair loss. Your nurse or doctor should be able to advise you if hair loss may occur.

When it comes to underlying health issues some of the most common causes of hair thinning or hair loss are autoimmune conditions, overactive thyroid and nutritional deficiencies.

Sometimes the reason for hair loss can’t be explained, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t find ways to look your best. Whatever the reason there are many helpful ideas, products and organisations that can offer you support and help with your hair care regime. We are here to help you with everything you need for expert hair care.

  • Prevention: The most important part of preventing hair loss is understanding the underlying cause. You can then consider an appropriate form of prevention or a way to help manage hair thinning/loss and take care of new hair growth. Side effects to medication- Some prescription medications can cause hair to become brittle and fragile, or to thin and fall out. Chemotherapy is a common cause of hair loss. A prevention treatment known as scalp cooling can, in some cases help to prevent this side effect. Always speak to your doctor if you are worried about hair loss as a side effect to medications. Sometimes your doctor may be able to consider an effective treatment path that won’t cause you this additional concern. If your particular medication does note hair loss as a possible side-effect it can often be very difficult to identify whether or not you will be affected. Sometimes it can be the underlying cause of a health issue or natural process such as during menopause. Product regimes that help to balance and rejuvenate the growth stage of the hair growth cycle can be beneficial in trying to protect fragile hair that can cause hair thinning and hair loss.
  • Camouflage/cover-up: If you do experience hair thinning or areas of hair loss there are lots of helpful products available that can help to blend in any areas that feel sparse. These camouflage and cover up products are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair. They are similar to styling products but specially developed to conceal areas of hair loss.
  • Maintenance: There are many helpful ideas to maintain hair while you are going through any changes. Whether or not you have experienced hair loss as a side effect to medications, due to an underlying health issue as a natural (yet unwanted) side effect of changes in your body or the cause is unknown, take a look at our tips below on how you can maintain fragile hair and encourage new hair growth.
  • Support: Styling products designed for hair thinning - You may like to try specialist styling products developed to help maximise your hair’s potential during this time. Brittle/dry hair and breakage - Regular trims and maintaining your hair’s moisture can prevent unnecessary breakage. Taking time to use conditioning treatments, heat protection and styling products designed for hair thinning and fragile hair can be very helpful.
  • Support: Supplements that support your hair - You may consider taking a supplement developed to support healthy hair growth.
  • Re-growth: When hair becomes thinner or less dense in volume it can be helpful to adjust your hair care regime and use products more suited to your hair’s needs. For example, products that help to stimulate the hair follicle into the growing (anagen) phase as well as shampoos and conditioners to strengthen and nourish new hair growth. Depending on the underlying cause of hair loss and in turn if new hair is a possibility, most people find that new hair growth normally takes around 3-6 months from the time the hair falls out. This is when the hair enters back into the hair growth cycle at the anagen stage. It can take a while for the new hair to integrate into your current style. If you have experienced hair thinning you may also like to use products that blend and camouflage areas of new hair growth with hair that didn’t fall out. This can be helpful when you experience shorter new hair amongst longer hairs.
  • Support: If you are at all concerned about hair thinning or hair loss you should always seek medical advice. Additionally there are several organisations that can help offer guidance and ideas.
1. Prevent hair loss

Many causes for hair loss can be prevented or reduced. The most important thing to consider is the underlying cause.

Once that has been established you can discover ideas and product ranges that are right for you. We have a host of products that can protect and even prevent or slow down hair loss. Taking care of thinning or fragile hair is also essential in maximising your hair’s potential.

3 steps to confidence:

  • Start by reading the most appropriate overview:
    - Overview Female Hair Loss/Thinning
    - Overview Male Hair Loss/Thinning
  • Discover and understand the hair growth cycle
  • Take a look at our specialist hair loss and thinning ranges of products and information:
    - Prevention
    - Camouflage/cover-up
    - Maintenance
    - Re-growth
2. Products to nourish and strengthen hair

We have an extensive range of products specially selected to offer you a broad range of options to help with hair loss. Our products are in categories that will help you to choose the right support. Our products cover a host of needs:

  • Prevention: Regimes that can help to minimise and reduce hair loss
  • Camouflage/cover-up: These specialist products are designed to help blend any areas of hair that feel sparse, making hair appear fuller as well as giving temporary colour. These innovative products for hair loss and hair thinning are temporary, meaning they will shampoo out when you next wash your hair. They are similar to styling products, but especially developed to conceal areas of hair loss.
  • Maintenance: You may like to try specialist products developed to help maximise your hair’s potential. For example, if hair is feeling brittle or fragile try our range of styling products specifically developed to support and create fuller looks for thinning hair. Additionally using shampoo and conditioner that stimulate the hair can help to provide an ideal platform for new growth.
  • Regrowth: When it comes to taking care of new growth, it is essential that you nourish and nurture new hair and continue to stimulate the anagen phase at the start of the new hair growth cycle.
3. Understanding the hair growth cycle

It can be helpful to have some information about the hair growth cycle so that you can have a better understanding of any problems you may encounter. Many hair loss and thinning products relate to specific phases within the hair growth cycle. Once you are familiar with the terms and phrases you will be better able to discover products that may be helpful.

The hair growth cycle consists of three stages called ‘phases’ known as

  • Anagen: Growing phase
  • Catagen: Transitional phase
  • Telogen: Shedding, falling out and resting phase

Take a look at our guide to understanding the hair growth cycle.

4. Disguise thinning and baldness

We offer a range of products specifically designed to help disguise hair thinning and areas of baldness. These easy to use products help blend and disguise areas of hair thinning, bald patches and also blend roots that need colouring.

Whether your hair has thinned or you have been advised not to colour it, our expert ranges are specifically designed to use at home, during hair loss to produce a natural fuller look.

Specialist products are cleverly designed to help fill in sparse areas, making hair look fuller and thicker. A wide variety of colour choices means that you can blend away any unwanted greys and white hairs or hide roots. Take a look at the very latest products to camouflage and cover up.

5. Take care of new hair growth

When it comes to taking care of new growth it is essential that you nourish and nurture new hair and continue to stimulate the anagen phase at the start of the new hair growth cycle.

Using products specially designed to support fragile new hair can help to maximise your hair’s potential and create an ideal platform for new hair to continue to grow and gain strength and stability.

Additionally you may consider taking a supplement to meet the nutritional needs of new hair. Take a look at our range of products to support new hair growth.

6. Supplements to support growth

What you eat and how your body absorbs and distributes essential vitamins, glucose and proteins is very important in maintaining the regular hair growth cycle. To support your diet, you may like to try specially developed supplements to help boost the nutritional needs of your hair.

7. Caring for your scalp

It is important to take good care of your scalp. The following tips may be helpful:

  • Reassess your scalp and hair care needs : It may be that you are new to hair thinning or hair loss and don’t know what products to use. A hairdresser can help you to assess your scalp and hair needs so that you can find appropriate products
  • Sun protection : Protect your scalp when in strong sunlight. Use sun protection products specifically designed for the face and scalp. This can be especially important if you are new to hair thinning or hair loss and not used to having to take this measure.
  • Nurture new hairs on the scalp: It is very important to protect new hair growth on the scalp. Our range of specialist products for new hair growth may be helpful.
8. Make up for eyelashes and eyebrows

There are many specialist items available to help create realistic looking eyelashes and brows and you don’t need to be a specialist to apply them. After a few practices you’ll find it easy to attach false eyelashes and create realistic brow.

9. Guidance during chemotherapy

Chemotherapy treatment for cancer can cause hair to be brittle, thin or completely fall out. This is because chemotherapy can interrupt the hair growth cycle.

Not all chemotherapy treatments cause hair loss. Hair loss or hair thinning is generally temporary, meaning that the hair normally grows back once treatment is complete.

The only known prevention is scalp cooling, a treatment used with some forms of chemotherapy to reduce hair loss.

We really want to support you during this time and have written an in-depth guide to understanding chemotherapy and hair loss that we hope you will find helpful.

10. Connect to support
i. Alopecia UK

"Alopecia UK is a charity that aims to provide information, advice and support for people covering a broad range of hair loss related topics. They also offer support groups throughout the UK. "

Alopecia UK

ii. Alopecia Awareness

"Alopecia Awareness is a charitable organisation with a website designed to enable people with hair loss to educate themselves. It says the most important thing to remember is that ‘You are not alone’.

alopecia-awareness.org.uk

iii. Cancer Hair Care

"Cancer Hair Care is the UK’s leading cancer hair loss charity offering advice, services and a helpline dedicated to helping people before, during and after cancer treatments. They also offer free headwear, booklets and educational toys and tools.

cancerhaircare.co.uk

iv. Little Princess Trust

"A charity that provides human hair wigs free of charge to children experiencing hair loss due to cancer treatment.

Littleprincesses.org.uk

v. My New Hair

""A charity providing education and training to hairdressers and giving support to those who suffer medical hair loss and who require natural looking wigs."

Mynewhair.org

Mynewhair.org

vi. NHS Choices

"NHS Choices is the UK's biggest health website. They offer extensive medical guidance about a vast range of hair loss topics and related medical issues. "

nhs.uk

vi. The Institute of Trichologists

"The Institute of Trichologists is a professional body. Registered members who have completed the professional qualification can provide specialist advice for hair problems including wigs, hair transplants, hair loss, alopecia, receding hair, baldness, hair thinning and hair growth.

Trichologists.org.uk